877-742-1270 Live Chat NOW Open New Account   myDirection Login
Self Directed IRA
self-directed ira

What is Self Directed IRA?

Fees

IRA Forms Contact Us

Self Directed IRA Articles

Coverdell ESA

HSA

how to ira
Self-Directed IRA

Self Directed IRA Articles - Other IRA Investments

Eat at Joe’s IRA’s Bar and Grill
By: Bill Humphrey

Many investors in the US are discovering that their plans for a carefree retirement are in jeopardy due to lack of funds. Creative investors are seeking more profitable solutions to their retirement plan investments. As more and more investors are learning, traditional financial advisors generally direct investors to traditional investments only…

Uncle IRA, the Venture Capitalist
By: Ben Brazda

While the average IRA holder trades public stock and mutual funds, it’s the sophisticated, self-directed investor who also keeps an eye open for growing, private companies. Every public company started out as a private business and almost all used…

Lending to Fund Non-Profit Organizations
By: Catherine Wynne

Ask the members to lend funds from their IRA and other tax-advantaged plans! Self-directed plans may lend funds and can benefit both the organization and the IRA holder. IRA lending using a self-directed IRA administrator allows the individual to choose their own investments, one of which can be a loan to the organization. These loans, for example, could be…

How to Care for a Check Book Control IRA
By: Bill Humphrey

Hundreds of companies and their websites advertise the Checkbook Control IRA by many different names: Checkbook IRA, Checkbook LLC, IRA-LLC. The Checkbook Control IRA is recommended for many different applications, but once the LLC is created, what do you do next?

Beware the “Too Good To Be True” Shortcut
By: John Sheflin

Unemployment is up, business loans are down and retirement funds are shrinking, leading many Americans to search for a solution. One option is commonly promoted as a way to “fund your business with your retirement plan”. Is this the solution? As if to answer that, the IRS recently released a memo titled, “When ‘Too Good to Be True’ Very Well May Be: Funding Business Startups with Plan Assets.”

Green Retirement Investing with a Self-Directed IRA

Retirement investors who want to invest responsibly are no longer limited to specialized mutual funds. Anyone can now invest in a private company which shares their passion, whatever that may be.

 

Back to News Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  877-742-1270 Live Chat NOW Open New Account   myDirection Login
Self Directed IRA
self-directed ira

What is Self Directed IRA?

Fees

IRA Forms Contact Us

Self Directed IRA Articles

Coverdell ESA

HSA

how to ira
Self-Directed IRA

Self Directed IRA Articles - Other IRA Investments

Eat at Joe’s IRA’s Bar and Grill
By: Bill Humphrey

The joy of entrepreneurship…

Many investors in the US are discovering that their plans for a carefree retirement are in jeopardy due to lack of funds. Creative investors are seeking more profitable solutions to their retirement plan investments. As more and more investors are learning, traditional financial advisors generally direct investors to traditional investments only. For investors used to having access to a wide variety of investments, the world of retirement investing seems very limited. Limited, that is, until they discover the Self-Directed IRA. Self-Directed IRAs reopen the door to the investment world that creative non-traditional investors know so well.

Let’s follow the steps of one such investor. Joe, 54, married, two kids, one dog, is a successful business owner and practiced investor. A few years ago, Joe had it all planned out. He was going to retire at 60 and move to New Syrmna, FL.

Joe’s retirement plan was doing well. It was invested in a variety of successful funds and stocks. Joe anticipated sitting back and waiting for the monthly automatic deposit to show up in his account. That vision changed over the course of a few months as his safe, secure paper investments lost over 35% of their value. One morning, Joe realized that he needed to pay more attention. After studying, researching and spending hours communing with the Wall Street Journal, Joe realized that he just wasn’t comfortable with stocks. Feeling his retirement dream slipping away, Joe turned to the bottle.

Fortunately, Joe only had a few bottles. Mainly he talked to his friends at his neighborhood bar. One of them, after listening to Joe’s story, introduced him to self-directed IRAs. Joe listened intently as his friend described the investments allowed in truly self-directed accounts. Joe realized that he had been hunting for investments in the wrong field, a field where he felt lost and uncomfortable. Reenergized, Joe headed home with new hope.

Joe took an inventory of his investing and other skills. His professional career as a restaurant equipment dealer had introduced him to a wide number of restaurant professionals. He also knew that he had a good eye for people and was usually good at identifying those with talent.

Knowing that his retirement plan could invest in almost any asset, including a business, Joe began to think about how he could use the skills and connections that he had to help his IRA grow through investing in a business. Joe, at the same time, took advantage of classes offered by New Direction IRA, Inc. on how self-directed IRAs function. At the conclusion of the class, Joe began the process of opening a self-directed IRA and moving his retirement funds into it. During the class, Joe learned that although his knowledge and connections could benefit his plan, his labor and assets couldn’t. Joe also kept his eyes open for businesses and opportunities as he met with clients for his job. Within a few months, one of Joe’s clients mentioned a local bar which was for sale. Joe did a little investigating. He certainly heard opportunity knocking. Not for himself, but for his IRA. Joe discovered that buying and owning a bar involved quite a bit of paperwork, particularly regarding the liquor license. Joe decided it would better for his IRA if it had a partner, ideally one familiar with the whole process. Joe found that the current bar owner didn’t really want to sell, but had to due to an unrelated financial difficulty. Joe realized that he might have found the perfect partner. Joe negotiated with the seller for Joe’s IRA to purchase 85% of the bar, which was actually a corporation known as “The Corner Bar”. The 15% left with the old owner was sufficient to keep the local licensing folks happy, but gave Joe’s IRA control of the operations. The purchase included some terms which made the old owner happy with his minority position.

Joe’s IRA invested $225,000 and as a shareholder, it controlled significant decision-making power. All the decisions Joe’s IRA made were actually made by Joe and executed through the IRA, so although Joe couldn’t wipe down the bar himself, he could use his eye for talent to hire expert bartenders to do the wiping. Joe’s IRA also provided funds to the corporation to do some upgrades in the bar and make some other improvements that Joe thought would make the bar more profitable. When Joe calculated the return on his IRA’s investment, he realized that after taxes, the investment was likely to return about 15% or around $35,000 per year. Joe decided to delay his retirement by two more years, giving him 8 years to accumulate earnings. He estimated that the cash from the bar investment will provide his IRA around $280,000 over the next 8 years, plus earnings on those funds. Joe expected the investment to be worth around $400,000 in 8 years.

Joe is dreaming of the beach again. But wait. The bar is producing earnings, which Joe’s IRA will have more money to invest. Hey buddy, have you heard of any good investment opportunities?

Back to top↑

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  877-742-1270 Live Chat NOW Open New Account   myDirection Login
Self Directed IRA
self-directed ira

What is Self Directed IRA?

Fees

IRA Forms Contact Us

Self Directed IRA Articles

Coverdell ESA

HSA

how to ira
Self-Directed IRA

Self Directed IRA Articles - Other IRA Investments

Uncle IRA, the Venture Capitalist
By: Ben Brazda

While the average IRA holder trades public stock and mutual funds, it’s the sophisticated, self-directed investor who also keeps an eye open for growing, private companies. Every public company started out as a private business and almost all used investors’ capital to get off the ground. Could you imagine if in the early 80′s your IRA invested in a private company called Microsoft? Unfortunately, that opportunity is long gone, but there are thousands of new businesses started each year and many will need seed capital to grow.

It just so happens that on your way to work tomorrow, your friend Kevin gives you a call. He started a business a few years ago and is now looking for investors to expand the company. You meet with him several times over the next few weeks and run the concept by your CPA. Ultimately, you decide that this would be an excellent investment for your currently idle Roth IRA account. Your CPA informs you that you need a specialized IRA administrator to process these types of investments and suggests that you give New Direction IRA a call.

You call New Direction the next morning and connect with Tina Garland. You tell her about the company and explain that you would like to use your Roth IRA for the investment. The first thing Tina asks is what type of business the entity is as some types do not allow IRA investors and others require the IRA to be a specific type of owner.

General Partnership (GP) - An IRA cannot invest into a GP because administrators will not allow an IRA to be a general partner. (All owners in a GP are general partners.)

Limited Partnership (LP, LLP, LLLP) - An IRA can invest into an LP as long as the IRA is listed as a limited partner.

Limited Liability Company (LLC) - An IRA can be a member in an LLC.

S-Corporation (S-Corp.) - S-Corp. rules do not allow IRAs to be shareholders.

C-Corporation (C-Corp.) - An IRA can purchase stock in a C-Corp.

The next question Tina asks is if there are any disqualified persons (DQPs) involved in the business. This is important because if the entity is currently managed by, or has a controlling interest held by DQPs, then it would be deemed a disqualified entity and is thus a prohibited investment.

Disqualified Persons (DQPs)
DQPs include the IRA holder, their spouse, lineal ascendants (parents, grandparents) lineal descendants (children, grandchildren) and their spouses as well as some business partners and financial advisors. Any entities owned by DQPs are also disqualified.

Tina follows up by asking if the entity will generate operating income or if it will have earnings from debt. The purpose of this question is to determine whether or not income from the entity would be subject to tax within the IRA.

Earnings from Debt
If the entity uses debt, net earnings from that debt would be subject to Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBIT). (i.e. an entity that purchases a mortgaged rental property.)

Operating Income
Income from the sale or lease of goods or services, or income from the sale of personal property is subject to UBIT. It is also important to know that the sale of real estate could also be deemed operating income in some cases.

Non-distributed Earnings
In pass-through entities (LPs and some LLCs), it is the IRA’s responsibility to file a 990-T and to pay UBIT (if it applies). This tax still needs to be paid even if the entity does not distribute it’s earnings during the year. Therefore, it is wise to keep additional funds in the IRA to cover this expense.

C-Corps. and UBIT
C-corps. (as well as some LLCs) pay their own taxes before earnings are paid out to investors. If this is the case, the IRA does not need to worry about filing a 990-T.

At this point, you may be asking yourself, “Why invest a tax-free Roth IRA into a company where the income would be taxable?” Well, if you’ve ever invested that Roth IRA in the stock market, you’ve done just that. Most publicly traded companies are C-corps and therefore earnings are taxed before they are sent out as dividends to investors.

Tina goes on to explain that if you had your heart set on investing in a General Partnership or S-Corp, or you really opposed UBIT, you could always structure the investment as a promissory note instead. A promissory note is a loan to the company, and therefore the entity type is irrelevant. Then, because the note has a fixed rate of return independent from the company’s earnings, it is not subject to UBIT.

Finally, Tina leaves you with a few helpful reminders. First, IRAs have contribution limits and required minimum distributions (RMDs), both of which could pose challenges if not planned for in advance. Second, for IRA transfers and distributions, it is important the company allows the ownership to be re-titled.

Capital Calls
Some companies require additional capital down the road through mandatory capital calls. It is critical you plan for such events well in advance. For example, if you used every penny in the account for the initial investment and the capital call is more than your plan’s yearly contribution limit, you will have a problem.

Required Minimum Distributions
Traditional IRA accounts require that the IRA holder start taking distributions at age 70 ½, and there is a 50% penalty if they are not taken. It is a good idea to ask the company about their liquidation policy, especially if you plan to hold the investment for that long.

Transfers and Distributions
If you ever decide to transfer your account to another administrator, distribute the investment, or in the event of your death, the account is inherited by your beneficiaries. It is important the company allows the ownership to be renamed accordingly.

After giving it some thought, you decide to move forward and you ask what the process is. Tina explains that the first step is to open an account with New Direction and to initiate a funds transfer. Once the account is established and funded, the investment can be made by sending in the required investment paperwork and forms. Tina sends you detailed instructions and forms as well as the IRA application, and thus, your journey into the world of self-directed IRA investing begins.

Back to top↑

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  877-742-1270 Live Chat NOW Open New Account   myDirection Login
Self Directed IRA
self-directed ira

What is Self Directed IRA?

Fees

IRA Forms Contact Us

Self Directed IRA Articles

Coverdell ESA

HSA

how to ira
Self-Directed IRA

Self Directed IRA Articles - Other IRA Investments

Lending to Fund Non-Profit Organizations or How to use your IRA Creatively and Mindfully
By: Catherine Wynne

Private schools, churches and other non-profit entities, regardless of focus or denomination, frequently have difficulty borrowing funds for building projects. The addition of classrooms, labs, a new steeple, additional capacity added to an existing facility, or even remodeling of an existing space all take money. The use of building fund drives has long been the method of fundraising, requiring significant long term planning and the uncertainty of consistent results.

There is another way.

Ask the members to lend funds from their IRA and other tax-advantaged plans! Self-directed plans may lend funds and can benefit both the organization and the IRA holder. IRA lending using a self-directed IRA administrator allows the individual to choose their own investments, one of which can be a loan to the organization. These loans, for example, could be:

  • In the form of a Note
  • Can be secured by the organization’s property
  • Would represent an investment for the IRA and would have to reflect a reasonable rate of return.
  • Would pass the benefit of interest on principal and fees to the IRA account as opposed to an outside lender.

Consider these examples:

The Youth Center

An inner city church has decided to add a teen social center in an existing space currently used for storage. The 1000 square foot area needs new flooring, painting, drywall partitions and restrooms. In addition, the furniture and equipment for Friday night movies and a pool table will be purchased. The cost of this project is estimated to be approximately $50,000. The youth group will charge for movies and food purchased at the location.

Funds are raised by creating a $50,000 note which will pay 5.5% interest annually. The note will be amortized on a 5 year schedule and the investors will be church members’ IRAs. Let us assume that 5 individuals come forth, each lending $10,000 from their IRA accounts using a self-directed administrator who is responsible for maintaining the tax-deferred status of the IRA accounts. Principal and interest flow back to the IRA account. The IRA holder has made a retirement investment that is secure and feels good too.

The Theatre

A small private school would like to have a venue for school assemblies and theatrical productions. It is anticipated that this new facility will boost enrollment as the Board has decided to focus on the arts in their curriculum. They have the room to expand on their current property and approach a local bank to fund the $500,000 price of this addition. The bank is interested in the project based on the reputation of the school and the predictability of the annual tuition paid by the students but is not willing to provide 100% funding.

With a $250,000 loan from the bank, the school trustees decide to issue “bonds” for the construction to interested parents and alumni. They structure the issue in $50,000 increments that will be offered in step with the construction. The interest rate offered will be based on some margin over the T-Bill rate at the time the bonds are issued. This allows them to only borrow the money when it is needed, thus controlling costs and allows them to offer current competitive rates to their investors.

Many individuals these days want their investments to, in some way, reflect their personal or political values. What better way to invest, not only in “what you know” but in what you believe as well.

Back to top↑

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  877-742-1270 Live Chat NOW Open New Account   myDirection Login
Self Directed IRA
self-directed ira

What is Self Directed IRA?

Fees

IRA Forms Contact Us

Self Directed IRA Articles

Coverdell ESA

HSA

how to ira
Self-Directed IRA

Self Directed IRA Articles - Other IRA Investments

How to Care for a Check Book Control IRA
By: Bill Humphrey

Hundreds of companies and their websites advertise the Checkbook Control IRA by many different names: Checkbook IRA, Checkbook LLC, IRA-LLC. The Checkbook Control IRA is recommended for many different applications, but once the LLC is created, what do you do next?

My goal in this piece is to describe the proper care and feeding of a “checkbook control” IRA-owned LLC, which in many ways looks just like a regular LLC – but is a very different entity with special needs and requirements. In addition, I want to point out some of the potential areas where extra caution is required.

First and foremost, it is important to realize that your IRA-owned LLC is an entirely independent and separate entity. Created by and owned by your IRA (not you), it is rather unique in the world of small business. Because of the IRS’s rules related to transactions within your IRA, you need to step carefully and pay more attention to the process than if you were using only personal funds. Your IRA funds are special due to the tax status that the IRS granted when you created your IRA.

To make sure you visualize the entity as one separate from you, I will call the IRA-LLC Elsie for the purposes of this article. Let’s imagine that Elsie is your niece and you will be investing on her behalf. She knows nothing about investing or the IRS rules, so you’ll have to make sure that not only is she making money, but she’s following all the rules. Keep in mind that the goal of this article is to help you keep Elsie’s activities and investments within the IRS rules for IRA investments and transactions. Note that there are additional rules about transactions with an IRA’s assets which go beyond the coverage of this article. Contact a self-directed IRA custodian for more details.

Elsie:

With your newly created Checkbook control IRA-LLC (Elsie), you are the manager responsible for the operations of the new business. As with any new business, you need to keep excellent records. When you choose and make investments for Elsie, the documentation for the transactions is important for two reasons. One, you must be able to prepare income and loss statements, as well as balance sheets for Elsie. Two, you must be able to show that Elsie’s transactions did not benefit you as an individual or any disqualified persons as according to the IRS.

Elsie probably already has a new tax ID number, but if she doesn’t you need to get her one. The bank of your choice will need the ID to open a checking account for Elsie, to receive the proceeds from your IRA. Note that the unique tax ID for Elsie is necessary as your Self-Directed IRA usually shares a common tax ID with all the other IRAs held by your custodian or administrator. If you haven’t done so already, visit the IRS website at www.IRS.gov and obtain a new Tax ID. The Tax ID is also referred to as an EIN (employer identification number), which is the equivalent of a social security number for an individual. The IRS has a simplified online system for the establishment of the number or you can submit a form called an SS-4.

Once the checking account is open, you can direct your IRA to purchase the ownership interest in your new IRA-owned Checkbook control LLC (Elsie). Once Elsie has money, then you need to think about how to keep track of those funds. Remember, those funds belong to Elsie, not you. Always remember that a certain government entity with the initials IRS might be looking over your shoulder at some point in the future.

The first step in recordkeeping is adopting a system. Many small businesses begin with software such as Quickbooks, Peachtree, or other accounting systems. I don’t recommend personal accounting systems such as Quicken or MS Money because they are geared towards personal expense tracking rather than a full business tracking system. Because Elsie is a full-fledged entity, she must have a complete set of books and records for her activities. The small business accounting systems will be of great benefit for producing statements for her operations.

Once you have your software, the next step will be to develop a system of tracking the paper generated from Elsie’s investments and other activities. Depending on what investments you decide for Elsie to make, the paperwork can be significant. If she buys real estate, there can be lots of paper – statements, invoices and receipts. However, if she buys something like a note, the paperwork can be much more limited. In either case, once again, due to the additional burden imposed on tax-sheltered investments and IRA funds, it is critical that you be able to show how all of Elsie’s funds were used. And why. Fully documenting any expense and income is the best way to show that Elsie remained under the tax shelter of the IRA and to show that you (or any DQ person) were NOT involved in the transaction. For more info on transactions and the consequences of being involved in a transaction with Elsie, see the Appendix.

Because Elsie is likely to have relatively few transactions, you should develop a routine to have documents, such as bank statements, invoices, and receipts, segregated from your own personal records CONTINUOUSLY! Many small business owners have suffered from the tendency to treat their small business operations rather casually until tax time. Elsie’s funds are not yours and therefore it is critical that you stress the separate handling of all of her activity. Someone may be looking at your records in the future. Protect your IRA and its tax-sheltered status from any question.
If you don’t separate your own business documents and assets from Elsie’s, the penalties can range from the disqualification of your entire IRA (resulting in taxes and penalties) to Federal Criminal prosecution for tax evasion and money laundering. I cannot stress enough that Elsie is not you, and her money is not yours. Treat her funds like they belong to a suspicious relative who is likely to show up at anytime and be very skeptical about how well you are taking care of his money. You should be ready at any time to show your crabby relative what you have done with his funds.

Now, with your recordkeeping system in place, your checkbook in front of you (with Elsie’s funds in the account), it is your time to search for her first investment.

Bill Humphrey is a principal of New Direction IRA, a self-directed IRA administrator. Bill is an experienced Certified Public Accountant who, over the past 20 years, has specialized in tax-related property issues and forensic accounting. Recognized by professional advisors as an expert in the self-direction of IRAs and other tax-advantaged accounts, Bill has studied the associated IRS codes pertaining to these investments for many years. He knows the ins-and-outs of IRA law and stays current with all legislation governing tax-deferred or tax-free retirement arrangements.

Back to top↑

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  877-742-1270 Live Chat NOW Open New Account   myDirection Login
Self Directed IRA
self-directed ira

What is Self Directed IRA?

Fees

IRA Forms Contact Us

Self Directed IRA Articles

Coverdell ESA

HSA

how to ira
Self-Directed IRA

Self Directed IRA Articles - Other IRA Investments

Beware the “Too Good to Be True” shortcut
By: Amy Sheflin

Unemployment is up, business loans are down and retirement funds are shrinking, leading many Americans to search for a solution. One option is commonly promoted as a way to “fund your business with your retirement plan”. Is this the solution? As if to answer that, the IRS recently released a memo titled, “When ‘Too Good to Be True’ Very Well May Be: Funding Business Startups with Plan Assets.”

Financial companies that promote this arrangement, the “Rollovers as Business Startups”, or ROBS arrangement, claim that the IRS has pre-approved the arrangement for years. However, the IRS reports that ROBS will be scrutinized very carefully, “may violate the law,” and “may be prohibited transactions.” If the arrangement is a prohibited transaction, the retirement account in question could be closed and the funds subject to excise taxes. The IRS warns that they will focus on any transaction that claims you can transfer money without paying taxes.

The IRS reports that they have seen an increase in transactions that try to “exploit the generous tax benefits enjoyed by qualified retirement plans.” Rules associated with the IRS are rarely described as “generous” or “simple”, but in this case, those descriptions are generally correct.

The IRS requires a custodian between the retirement plan holder and the retirement funds. You can’t spend the retirement money on yourself, your family, or your business, until you retire. Simple.

Play by the IRS rules, and most retirement plan contributions and investment profits are tax-free or tax-deferred. Generous.

Playing by the IRS rules, in this case, is easier than it sounds. With an approved custodian between you and your retirement funds, you can choose how to invest the money – as long as the investment is not in yourself or your company. Be careful of any company that offers to get around these rules. Like the ROBS arrangement scrutiny, similar focus is expected soon on the highly promoted “checkbook control” scheme for assets within an IRA.

Many options remain for the retirement investor who wants to avoid the ROBS trap yet escape the stock market roller coaster. Catherine Wynne, president of New Direction IRA, Inc., which provides custodial services on self-directed IRAs, said, “Our clients have invested in everything from condos to motels, in addition to foreign stocks and gold bullion.”

Back to top↑

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  877-742-1270 Live Chat NOW Open New Account   myDirection Login
Self Directed IRA
self-directed ira

What is Self Directed IRA?

Fees

IRA Forms Contact Us

Self Directed IRA Articles

Coverdell ESA

HSA

how to ira
Self-Directed IRA

Self Directed IRA Articles - Other IRA Investments

Green Retirement Investing with a Self-Directed IRA

Retirement investors who want to invest responsibly are no longer limited to specialized mutual funds. Anyone can now invest in a private company which shares their passion, whatever that may be. David Williard, like all retirement investors, wants diversity in his retirement fund and long term growth on his investments. He would prefer to minimize the impact on the environment, while making money. In Williard’s case, he has diversified his self-directed IRA by investing in a commodity that is about as green as they come – trees.

Catherine Wynne, president of New Direction IRA, explains that with the self-directed IRA, “Our clients who want the freedom to invest in private companies and real estate can transfer old 401(k)s and standard IRAs into a self-directed IRA with us.”

Williard used his self-directed IRA to buy shares in a private company – The Bauers Family Tree Farm. The company bought a 260 acre cattle ranch in Costa Rica. The land, which had been clear-cut 50 years ago for cattle ranching, now has 45,000 teak trees on 140 acres. “120 acres is forest that will never be cut down,” said Joe Bauers, one of the owners of the Bauers Family Tree Farm. “We see monkeys, ocelots, armadillos; it really is a jungle.”

Bauers and his investors are not planting teak trees as a charitable contribution – they expect a healthy return. In five year increments, some of the trees will be cut down and sold, and the empty areas will be replanted with more teak trees. Williard believes the tree farm is “poised for long term growth.”

Williard is part of a recent trend of investors who want to do good while doing well. A growing number of these people are using a self-directed IRA to invest in private companies of their choice.

New Direction has seen many clients grow their retirement fund while investing where their heart is. Wynne said, “Our clients have used their IRAs to loan money to their church building fund, they’ve invested in companies who make energy efficient windows, and they can still invest in a green mutual fund, all within their self-directed IRA.”

 

Back to top↑